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Issue: August 2010
Aromatic Properties

by: Lana Bortolot
Photos by the author

As if New York didn't have enough supermodels, a group of tall, slender and pretty things are now making the rounds in the city's bar scene. Mathilde Liqueurs, known for their distinctive elongated bottles as much as their fresh fruit profiles, are enjoying riveted attention at the bar, thanks in large part to the renewed interest in all things organic.

   

"We have been on the market for a few years but we're popular now because of the organic food trend here," says Guillaume Lamy, Vice President of Sales at parent company Cognac Ferrand. While the fruits sourced for the spirits are not organically grown, they are 100 percent natural, and have strong terror-driven flavors.

The fresh-fruit profiles of Mathilde have made the spirit especially popular this spring as bars across the city search for this season's answer to the oh-so-last-year Mojito. "Mixologists are looking for better cordials to use in cocktails," notes Lamy. "They're more interested in ingredients than brands. We've provided the instrument; these guys are the soloists."


The liqueurs, launched in 2001, come in five flavors: pear, black currant, raspberry, peach and orange. Mathilde Pear is the fastest-growing version but also the hardest to produce because of the fruit's fragility, according to Lamy. But, he says despite the production challenges, the spirit-a Gold Medal winner at THE TASTING PANEL's 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition-has great potential for breaking new ground.

Last year, Mathilde distributed 10,000 cases total in the United States, and Lamy estimates that in four to seven years that number could reach as high as 80,000. "The spirits industry is now becoming like wine was 50 years ago; people want quality and seek more esoteric flavors."

At the World Bar at United Nations Plaza, Cocktail Development Director Jonathan Pogash has created a spring-into-summer menu with Mathilde Peach. His Economic Stimulator cocktail is a fruit blast, designed especially for the bar's international audience. "The U.N. crowd responds well to punches," he says. "This one is delicate, but the flavors are still decipherable.

"The New York market has been and will continue to be fresh-fruit driven" says Pogash. That makes it the perfect venue for these delicious and fashionable liqueurs.

Made in France from family recipes more than 100 years old, Mathilde liqueurs are produced by traditional methods. Top-quality fruits from the best growing areas are selected from orchards cared for and tended in compliance with strict rules, assuring that the fruit receives the best treatment throughout its growing and ripening process. 
 
 
Stimulus package. Mixologist Jonathan Pogash puts the final touch on his Economic Stimulator cocktail at World Bar in Manhattan.

Mathilde Peach, Mathilde Raspberry and Mathilde Blackcurrant are made from fruit infusions to extract their aromatic properties. The fruit is steeped in alcohol for several weeks, and the mixture is carefully stirred several times a day to obtain a harmonious blend of fruit and alcohol. Pure water is then gradually added to reduce the alcohol content to the desired level for bottling. Once the steeping process has been completed, the liquid is drawn off and the fruit is discarded. Lastly, top quality sugarcane syrup is added to balance the fruit's natural tastes and sharpness.

 

Economic Stimulator
created by Jonathan Pogash for the World Bar, New York City

1 oz. Myers's dark rum
½ oz. Mathilde Peach Liqueur
½ oz. apricot liqueur
½ oz. pomegranate juice

Shake well and strain over ice in chimney glass. Garnish with orange twist.




Calypso Cocktail
created by Jonathan Pogash for The Carnegie Club, New York City

1 oz. 10 Cane rum
½ oz. Mathilde Peach Liqueur
½ oz. fresh lemon juice
½ tsp. agave nectar
1 large cucumber slice

Muddle the cucumber slice in the agave and lemon juice. Add remaining ingredients and shake well. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with cucumber slice dipped in sugar on rim of glass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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